Watertown--So you say, “What in the Sam hill is foie gras?” This is the fancy French way of saying fatty goose liver. Now most Wisconsinites are familiar with fat livers as we take pride in supporting Miller and Johnsonville which cause our livers to beg for mercy as they become infused with fatty goodness.

Foie gras is typically served in some swanky big city restaurants which similar hard to pronounce names. Back in the late 1800’s as Watertown searched for industry, the act of noodling caught on due to big city demand. Noodling consists of force feeding noodles to geese in an effort to create a fatty liver. The last known noodler of Watertown was Mrs. Rummler who gave up the practice in the 1950’s.

Ned Landread of Ned’s Noodles has been looking for a means to use up all the seconds created in the noodle making process. Ned is a longtime resident of Watertown and after looking into the history of the process thought this would be a viable means to get rid of these seconds instead of sending them to the local landfill. Ned says, “I’m always trying to find ways to make my company greener and this just seems like a homerun to me.”

This will be more of a challenge than Ned realizes as this practice has now been outlawed as it was deemed inhumane to animals. So instead of being able to create a greener business (as seems to be the standard these days), Ned will continue to fill our ever growing mountains of trash with something that could be filling our ever growing bellies (via foie gras) instead.

 

Thursday, September 11, 2014 10173
This article first appeared in 2001 The American Regional Meat Packing Industry Traders (ARMPIT), under pressure from PETA, has decided to completely change its practices of killing animals. The move comes as a surprise, though leaders in the industry are taking it in stride.
Wednesday, November 30, 2011 5575
Scott Walker says the NBA has dropped the ball in settling with its union thug employees, claiming he could have devised a much better deal for the owners using techniques he learned while creating a better system for management/employee relations in Wisconsin. “I think I have some experience in dealing with greedy workers,” said Walker, while campaigning at a factory in Manitowoc. Walker went on to outline a multiple-step process that David Stern should have implemented in dealing with the union: (comments are based on what Walker told a college-educated intern, who wrote them down)

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